Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Thrift Store Reseller Hatred, Bannings, & Security Escorts: Ever Heard of This?

A long-time reader sent me an e-mail he'd like you to answer. I'll give you the gist of it, then let's discuss. He's a reseller who frequents a popular Thrift Store where many resellers stalk their quarry. He quietly picks his prey and minds his own business, but was suddenly confronted by the store-owner as a problem:

When I asked the manager for specifics on the day he escorted me out he wasn't able or wasn't willing to give me any examples of what I had done to disrupt his business. He just said I'd had 10-15 complaints that day and was done for the day. He then asked me where I sold and pointed my face out to head cashier and security.

When I confronted the security guard for following me around the store the  next week he just said he was told to "watch the stock room doors" and that if I had one more complaint against me I would be banned for life. I then asked him if customers complained to him or if he sees anything in my behavior that I should change, he said no and that the manager was just being difficult to everyone. I let him know I understood he was doing his job and went about shopping.

I went to the store the following day  and the store manager just looked at me with a stare. I didn't go today, and feel like this next week is a good time to stay clear of that particular store, evaluate my actions with other pickers / customers, scope out alternative stores, and  focus on creating an online store. 

He says he's not the only one getting reseller hatred. Dealers have to check out through separate lines where the merchandise is examined by cashiers so the prices of similar pieces can be raised later. My reader, who asked his name and the shop name be kept anonymous, feels resigned to the fact that as a "dealer" h has to endure different treatment than the "regular customers".

My Thoughts: I've never had to deal with this kind of reseller discrimination. Our Goodwill pound store has security escort the items out and gives the word before shoppers can look through them, but it's nothing like this. Our stores and vendors are just happy to get rid of their merchandise, whether you're a reseller or not. After all, resellers or not, we're all customers! Dammit!

What would you do if faced with this situation? Are there Thrift Stores like this where you live? How do you feel about the future of reselling? I get stories like this more and more.
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59 comments:

  1. Unheard of! Isn't that discrimination? Sounds like a lawsuit waiting to happen there. I mean, in a Target, do managers care what you do with the merchandise once you pay? It's none of their business. Security at a thrift store? Mine are run by little old lady volunteers, but these stores are not big name companies. Weird world.

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    1. I'm with you, it shouldn't have to be this difficult. If people are worried that resellers will "take all the good stuff" it's a first-come-first-serve system in any retail situation.

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    2. Have been thinking some more-- people who are anti-resellers, do they consider what percentage of our merch does not sell? We donate too. We buy then wash, iron, fix, rehab pieces. Rarely do I take an item straight from a sale a snap a picture. Don't see any of us getting rich either!

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    3. Actually, people at Target, Walgreens, etc. care quite a bit about what you do with merchandise afterwards. It's not particularly sensible, but there's a lot of hating on people who are big on coupons, rebates, etc., and the only justification I've even gotten was that people were reselling.

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    4. Lynn: That's a good point, I anyone with a huge cart (or more) full of a large amount of the same item or type of item will raise red flags no matter where you're at.

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    5. Diane: Very true, I always at LEAST have to wipe an item down with a dry or damp cloth to remove some dust before I snap a picture, but it often involves some extensive hours-long cleaning.

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    6. I have been in thrift stores with security. One in Toronto. One in Detroit. One in Columbus. All in ghetto areas.

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  2. I've never heard of such a thing, how awful! You're right, resellers are customers too!

    Adrienne
    What Lola Wants

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    1. Glad it's not common everywhere, that's just craziness.

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  3. Ah yes I have seen it before. For all the resellers out there. I being one for 13 years and would never cross these lines.
    1. You resellers often get so comfortable you will pick through a box right as others people are looking through it.
    2. I have even seen you grab box as one person is looking through to get a better look yourself.
    Stop being rude and cutting infront of regular folks and you will stop being hated.
    Just because you want to find the next great find to resell, does not in any way give you rights step in front of other folks looking or to grab into boxes other are looking at.
    Resellers learn to wait you turn!

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    1. I agree here, there are pushy resellers giving the rest of us a bad name. I NEVER fight for merchandise, snatch, or get rude with it. There's too much to go around for me to waste my energy fighting with people over stuff.

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    2. Oh and these days I make sure not to shop with people who are going to be dicks, either. haha

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    3. I've been a reseller for 2-3 years and I've never been pushy or rude to anyone. I say "excuse me" and I wait my turn. Just because some of us haven't been reselling for 13 years doesn't mean we are all rude. There's also nothing in his letter that makes me think he is rude. He seems to be very conscientious - asking them what he did wrong and wondering how to make it right.

      I've never seen that kind of behavior at a thrift store but I've seen lots of pushy people at estate sales. I've been pushed by an old man to go inside a house when there was a limit on how many people could be in at one time (it was tiny) and the estate sale company had told me to wait. He kept (literally) pushing me to go in and I told him, "Just because YOU want to break the rules doesn't mean I'M going to." That is the rudest I've ever been to someone while shopping for my business.

      To answer Van's original question - I've never heard of anything like this and I think it's CRAZY.

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    4. Also, complaining about prices and/or trying to haggle with people who can't change prices because of store policy (I'm looking at you people at my local Goodwill. Or pointing out that you're getting a steal as you get it. Or asking that certain types of merchandise be held for you.

      I'm not suggesting all resellers do this. Both of my parents are antique dealers, and they don't do this. But I do think that these sorts of things do give dealers a bad name.

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    5. Jamie: I'm glad I've never been pushed by someone, I don't know how I'd react to that. I always say "excuse me" and wait, too. I rarely let it get under my skin if someone happens to be rude, I'm always in a good mood while hunting and don't let negativity get to me. Again, there's lots to go around. And you do get a LOT farther being nice and making conversation with vendors/store owners than being a dick!

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    6. Lynn: I nearly always ask if I can get something for less because it's worth a try. Our local Goodwills are not allowed to make deals but on rare occasion I'm given one. I'm never rude about it, I politely ask and if it's a "no" I just buy the item or move on. I make sure not to shop with people that try to haggle with the thrift store owners, point out they're getting steal, and act generally rude.

      There's a bit more back and forth with the haggling process at flea markets, at least where I'm at, that's expected but I always make sure to be polite about it and especially never complain about any vendor's prices. I may not like it but they've got the right to price their merchandise whatever they want the same way I do.

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    7. I have done a lot of secondhand shopping and never have I seen one of my fellow dealers act in such a fashion.

      On the other hand though, I have experienced many nondealers acting a-fool and forgetting their manors in public.

      I find it rude for any store to target customers in a negative way. It's bad for business. I would probably get busy writting letters to the store owner, tell my fellow dealers, and post on Craigslist regarding my experience.

      I honestly don't get it. A customer is a customer. Not my problem if you price your shit too low. What I do have a problem with though is thift store misguiding the public into believing they are chartible organizations when infact they are 'for profit' businesses who pay nothing for their inventory.

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    8. I've kind of been debating whether I would post this, but I'm posting because this sort of thing is a reason that I'm a little skeptical that we're getting the full story in the original. It may seem like you are very polite when asking about getting a discount, and I'm sure your manners are lovely. However, from the perspective of the person on the other side, I don't see how there's a particularly polite way to say to someone that "I know that your policy is to not give discounts and that you could get fired if you do, but I am more concerned about getting $.50 off this item than I am about asking you to do something that could lose you your job."

      Talking with the people who work at my local Goodwill, this obviously frustrates and flusters them. They really don't like it. Even when it's done in a polite way.

      All that said, you can always do what you like. I'm just pointing out that sometimes the fact that a store doesn't like someone might come as a surprise when it really shouldn't.

      I also have to say that I have spent my entire life around resellers, literally in the thousands. I have seen them do all of these things at thrift stores, antique malls, garage sales, and auctions. I've seen nonresellers do all of these things too. Being a jerk isn't limited to one of those groups (nor is being nice).

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  4. I had a very nice cashier talk about how much she really liked everything I was buying, and then she said, "do you have a store on Etsy?" I said I did and she asked me for my store names because she loves etsy. So I gave her my store names (I have nothing to hide and I did nothing wrong, so I didn't see any problem with it, and she was super nice) she did check out my stores and she sent me a message saying that she also has an etsy store, but she couldn't say anything at the thrift store she works at and she is not allowed to buy from her own store (wow, I didn't know that!)Quite clearly, most cashiers can tell if someone is a reseller. I don't know why they would have a problem with it. They are purchasing at the price that the store is asking, and the item is selling. Who gives a shit what happens to it once its sold. I sell my kids stuff at my garage sale. Some people buy a lot of certain items because they are going to resell on Ebay or something. I really don't care what they do with it. They bought it from me at my asking price. I don't care if they want to dress up their pet goat. Just pay me and be gone. I don't care. Why should thrift stores be any different. People like us keep them in business!

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    1. Same here, I know people buy from me for resell and have no problem with it. I want the item gone, have fun with it! Sell it, keep it, paint it, whatever you please. I have heard of people not being able to buy from their own thrift store, that can be one way to prevent people working there from "hoarding" all of the good stuff. Still should be a perk of working there though, I won't lie, I've considered a part-time job at a thrift sorting merch just for prime access to the fresh wares. But you can get to a store early and yield the same results.

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    2. Sometimes I wonder, as I'm buying a bargain from an antique store, if all the customers are buying items to resell in their shop...lol. I actually give my tax resell number at antique malls and share my business card, but I never do at a thrift store. I've never had any problems. I wish some resellers from New York would stop at my booth and buy it all so they could double their money or more in their shop.
      I have noticed at a few signs at stores posting that their employees can not purchase items. I'm sure this is so customers feel that not all the good items are snagged by employees.

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    3. I'm sure we have a fair amount of resellers shopping our antique malls, too. The prices are so low! I have to stop myself from buying merch while I'm restocking all the time.

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  5. I've run into a few rude re-sellers in my thrift store outings. But my main complaint is that pricing at many stores is really increasing to the point that it's not fun anymore. I think some store managers think that just because someone prices something high on etsy, they can price the same in the store. Therefore, their merchandise is not moving and people who used to buy for their own needs (not re-selling) are priced out of thrift stores. This is nuts.

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    1. This is one reason why I rarely shop at thrift stores these days for merchandise and prefer flea markets. But it's worth it to visit them frequently, good things always slip through the cracks.

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    2. It's a mix where I live in terms of pricing. Within the same store, you can find bargains and outrageously priced items. The same with estate sales, as most of them are run by professionals. But I remain hopeful that eventually, as more and more resellers buy less and less merchandise at thrift stores due to the high prices, the thrift stores will bring their prices back down to earth. Something's got to give.

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  6. I haven't seen it as much in any of the chains (GW,Salv Army,St.Vincent's), but I've seen similar in a smaller store, like a mom and pop. But usually, the re-seller is acting in a way thats giving a good reason to be singled out. Sort of unusual for a manager to focus on ALL the resellers. I'm gonna agree I've seen this sort of bad behavior at Estate Sales a lot more, but to some degree I think everyone expects that.

    Regarding the "watch the stock room doors" that the security guard was told to look out for... I'm wondering if the original impetus for the hatred toward resellers may be the result of "hovering". There are a few thrift stores near us where people wait right at the entrance to the stock room door, looking through the window, some even going inside to check out an item when employees are not looking. They also run after the carts of merch that get pushed out of the doors. I call it hovering, and it's pretty obvious (and poor form, imho)

    I'm a reseller myself but this behavior really annoys me, because they're looking for an unfair advantage - it's laziness and greed, instead of just working to be more knowledgable about items they could pick. So when other customers who are regulars but not resellers see this, they might complain to the manager. It's just a guess though.

    I agree - if you frequent a thrift shop to resell, you just gotta be careful and be super polite at all times. Its possible that as resellers we get too comfortable at a thrift as several have said, and the actions we take may be judged as offensive - sometimes unfairly. It's tough sometimes, but you just have to do what you can to stay on everyone's good side.

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  7. Yeh, I would never stalk the stock room doors, not my method. It pays to be polite instead, store owners and vendors like to give deals to friendly frequent shoppers that buy a lot of merchandise in my experience.

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  8. I have never heard of this!! Sounds a little crazy :(

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  9. This sounds pretty ridiculous, but totally within the limits of the law. I just wonder how they found out he was a reseller. It seems to me, you should keep that shit on the DL. I wouldn't want to know someone was buying my items and then selling them again. That's why some companies offer wholesale and others don't. It seems like reselling from thrift stores is a fine line, and I think resellers should be extra discreet and not let their occupation be known.

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    1. I buy very small amounts at thrift stores and behave so I don't raise any alarms anyway but I do keep my reselling agenda on the downlow.

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    2. I keep my reselling agenda on the down low, too, and am always low key and polite. As long as a reseller is behaving properly and not disrupting other customers or the staff, I don't see how it is anyone else's business what anyone does with the merchandise after they pay for it. Do we really want to become a society where we have to poke our noses in other people's affairs and act like the reselling police? What business is that of yours?

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  10. Wow. This level of security and dare I say reseller discrimination is more than a little strange. While I do resell, I also shop for myself, as gifts for other likeminded secondhanders and for repurposing projects. I couldn't imagine being a customer any where and being treated this way.

    But on the topic of resellers being too pushy, rude, obnoxious, etc... I say that no matter what the title in the thrift business (buyer, reseller, manager, security, staff, volunteer)...there are a whole lot of asses. It's wrong to stigmatize a reseller over your average buyer...because rude just comes in all shapes and sizes.

    <3 Jackie @ Let's Go Thrifting

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    1. Quite true, I've dealt with rudeness from non-resellers and regular shoppers alike.

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    2. Human nature is human nature. Niceness or rudeness is not limited to particular groups of people.

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  11. We live in a small town and pretty much know all the employees at my local GW. That said, they often let the kids pick out toys for free and often give me a discount when I buy a lot of stuff.. Ex: I once bought a whole set of lovely dishes that were individually priced which totaled something in the $30 range. I discreetly pulled the manager over to the shelf where the dishes were and asked if I could get a little discount if I bought them all, and she let me have them all for $15 instead. Then she even went in the back to get a box and newspapers and helped me wrap them then wrote a new price on the side of the box for the cashier.

    I have never mentioned to any of them that we resell items but once, when someone had obviously donated their (or someone else's) entire vintage tea pot/ creamer collection and I had about 20 of them in my cart, one of the workers commented I must be selling them on ebay! But he didn't say it in a mean way at all, and I never confirmed to him if I was going to resell them or not.

    It seems kind of strange for a thrift shop to escort someone out but I would assume his behavior must have been worse than he let on because I would think the store wouldn't care who buys it, but if customers were complaining about him... well, that kind of says a lot.

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    1. Hey Jenny,

      Thanks for commenting. This is "the guy" who is seeking other opinions on the situation. I'm going to address the group as a whole in this response as to not get repetitive. So thank you all for taking time to share.

      It's great so many of you are comrades with your fellow dealers and thrift store employees. If dealers worked together more versus strictly seeing others as competition then I believe we'd all share greater success.

      However, when money is involved, I'm not holding my breath for that belief. I shop among vultures, and had to become one myself in order to survive. I'm someone who shops 5-8 hours a day. I'm someone who grabs first. I'm someone who ends up with premium merchandise. I'm someone who gets attention. I can't avoid or control the emotions of others. I won't apologize for being good at my job.

      I'd love to deal under the radar, but when you are consistently hauling out deco dining sets and Eames era designer chairs, you become a little hard to miss. I'm preaching to the choir when I say, high end merchandise is difficult to come by. When 10-30 dealers are always present, only one will get that kind of pay off that day.

      Do things get aggressive? I'd say so. People grab for fresh merchandise at the same time (myself included). People have been in fist fights (thankfully NOT with me), verbal arguments (had my fair share when I "win" the item), and everything else you might imagine. The stories I could tell... well that's a whole other blog.

      Some people call me an angel while others call me a devil. Bottom line is, my behavior is no worse than the average shopper, and I'm including dealers and non-dealers alike. I don't go looking for trouble. I'm a respectful guy. I'm also a guy who doesn't stand for being bullied. (Yes, we have... shopping bullies. Man, as I keep writing things get more absurd.)

      To sum up how I feel in one sentence, what is done with items once purchased is nobody's business.

      I don't pay off employees. I don't expect favoritism. I don't even expect a fair shot at new merchandise (those who pay off the cart pusher pay for the cart to hand privilege). I don't expect life to be fair.

      I do expect to be able to shop in peace (relatively speaking). I do expect to checkout through the same lines as "normal" shoppers. I do expect to work hard for success. I expect to be treated as a human being.

      With that said, I realize my personal behavior has to be pulpit in proportions as someone who grabs attention with every purchase made. What I do or don't do reflects on all dealers at this store and vice versa. Dealers are all one beast to this manager. I try my best to behave in a manner that wouldn't embarrass my Grandmother.

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    2. Jenny: Thanks for sharing your story. I've had people comment that I must be a reseller but they never refuse me merchandise or give me separate treatment.

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    3. Thanks for the e-mail and comment here. Even when everyone else is doing it you can expect complaints when arguments and grabbing first is involved. Do follow-up with me and let me know how standing-back works for you.

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    4. The average shopper doesn't have to become a vulture in the thrift store to survive, nor do they shop in the thrift store 8 hours a day, nor do they get aggressive, nor do they get in verbal arguments.

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    5. Hi There,

      I'm specifying what is considered average shopping behavior of both dealer and non-dealer alike within this one particular store. The store itself, I'd link to the difference between the Major and Minor Leagues.

      Thanks for the comments and giving me something to further think about.

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  12. What business is it of the seller what you are going to do with the merchandise after? Selling from thrift stores is fine, selling from yard sales and estate sales is fine, selling from curbside garbage is fine. These are not ethical questions. I know people who buy on ebay to sell on EBAY! If they can recognize the item and get the right price to make a profit, what's the problem? I've had offers from antique shops and thrift stores to help them price their merch higher, really looking for info on the kinds of things I'm interested in. But I tell them, if you priced it higher, I wouldn't be buying it - and no one in my area finds California pottery or odd banks exciting like I do. If the manager is not the owner, write the owner a letter about how you were made to feel. If the manager has the final say so, then I'd spend the extra time to go out of town.

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  13. 1. I am constantly amazed at how naive the comments on political thrifting issues on this blog seem to be. I am totally surprised that y'all just thought it was no big deal to shop somewhere and sell somewhere else and that you have the right to do so. Because, honestly, no one has the right to go shopping. I mean that literally, check the Bill of Rights, ain't no guarantee to shopping there. (http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html) But also, it's pretty rude, the attitude I'm seeing here, about the right to go shop and resell and you shouldn't be discriminated against. 'Cause you know, how resellers aren't a protected class or anything. (Same goes for your indignation when stores raise their prices.)

    2. Lest you think I'm just a big jerk calling you out on the attitude I dislike, I found proof that U.S. citizens have the right to resell (rent, lease, loan) whatever they've bought legally. This is why libraries, video stores, and Goodwill exist. It's not a violation of copyright law for you to buy something and resell it. Proof via the government and also Wikipedia's larger outline : http://www.justice.gov/usao/eousa/foia_reading_room/usam/title9/crm01854.htm ; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First-sale_doctrine

    3. Which is to say, all Americans buying in American places are fully allowed to buy whatever they want and resell it and cannot be refused sale for that reason alone. I didn't look up any info on anyone's rights to kick your ass out of their establishment for whatever reason they want. Maybe they can throw you out for your behavior and maybe your behavior wasn't right. Maybe you have to wear proper clothes. I don't know, and I'm not commenting on that.

    4. But still, I think it would just behoove you to play nice and keep the, "Oh hey, thanks for the cheap prices so I can IMMEDIATELY RESELL THIS FOR MY OWN PROFIT," shit on the DL. Because, maybe it's legal...and quite frankly, I feel like if you're supporting a charity shop, you've already done a great thing. But seriously, if you're buying from a private thrift store, it is kind of shitty. Maybe you can't see it from that point of view, but I totally can.

    5. Just wanted to point out your legal rights and give you some thoughts from a non-reseller. You do not have to agree with me about why I can see reselling as rude. I just wanted to say it so you know, devil's advocate and all that. My apologies if I seemed assy, just tryin' to put in another perspective and let you know your actual legal rights. (In the U.S., can't say for anywhere else.)

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    1. I always play nice and agree that's the way to go.

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    2. You seem to be contradicting yourself. You say on the one hand, "no one has the right to go shopping," yet in your next point, you say "that U.S. citizens have the right to resell (rent, lease, loan) whatever they've bought legally." We don't have the right to go shopping, but we can resell what we've bought?? How do you suppose we can exercise our right to resell if we don't have the right to shop???

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  14. Just the other day I was in a thrift store and one customer was loudly complaining to another customer about "people in here takin' photos of stuff and looking up prices so they can resell it." She said it made her really angry because she's been supporting thrift stores all her life -- she buys second hand and when she's done with it, she takes it back to the thrift store. She really had a problem with the idea of someone buying something and reselling it. I must say I was surprised to hear her point of view. I didn't know people felt that way. I just assumed that if the thrift store priced something, they would be glad to get the asking price and see the item move out the door. If people aren't buying to resell, why would they be buying so much of other people's old junk? I would be willing to bet that resellers make up a good 50% of the thrift store traffic in my town -- don't quote me on that it's just a guess, but an educated one.

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    1. Around here I'd say the percentage of resellers depends on the thrift store in question. Many of the shoppers are people looking for low-priced household essentials, clothes, etc. I think a lot of people get bitter about resellers because they think we just immediately resell it for more not accounting for the cleaning/fixing/inventory/marketing/listing/tagging/etc. that goes into it. Not to mention the stuff that doesn't sell and ends up being donated again at a loss.

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    2. To which I respond, "And resellers don't support thrift stores and donate items back?"

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  15. Van, I think you have summed this situation up very well in the past (I'm paraphrasing here) by saying that if you have a good enough eye to spot the value in an item and then put in the time and work required to resell it for a profit, you are well within your rights. To be able to do that is not a skill everyone has (not even all "resellers").

    Speaking from personal experience I have made some huge scores on things I thrifted and then resold. But I have also taken some losses. I run a business, not a charity (that would be the thrift store, who, by the way is getting their inventory for free, making a profit and not paying the taxes I pay) and I have to make $ to support myself and my family. If it were not ethical to buy from a thrift store and resell, I wouldn't do it. But I don't feel that way, and frankly, I don't know of any thrift store around here that has a problem with it.

    More than 90% of my inventory has been thrifted and I'm sure that holds true with many other resellers. If we couldn't find merchandise in a thrift store to resell, I think Etsy and Ebay would probably go out of business in a hurry, along with many thrift stores as well. We (the resellers and their buyers) have created a secondhand/"vintage" culture that in turn supports many other individuals and businesses. It's not just about "getting things cheap"- it's so much more than that.

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    1. I do like how we're discussing the issue of losses, we don't turn around every single thing we buy. And some items we sit on for months or years before it sells. Store owners don't realize the work, time, and gamble we put into it sometimes.

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  16. Go to another thrift store maybe? There are about 5 that I visit with every damn intention to resell it online and they usually sell. You gotta have more than one store to go to. You can't FREQUENT a thrift store. That's the best way to arouse suspicion. Of course, being a 26 year old male and buying 6 or more youth sports tops isn't exactly stealthy, but I do it. I buy sports anything. Shirts, jackets, youth sizes, anything. They sell pretty well. Because sports fans are INSANE! And they'll blow their cash on anything team related. Especially if that team is currently in the finals.

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    1. I spread it out, too. And mostly hunt at flea markets, regular vendors recognize me and love that I buy them out :D

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  17. As a reseller, I have been shopping at Crossroads Trading. They are a clothing resell store that mainly buys out the merchandise from sellers, but a part of their business is also consignment. On average I spend $500-$800 per month at this store. Last week I went in and picked out about 12 items to purchase for a sales total of about $400. Upon checking out, I was asked why I was buying about 8 purses. I said I'm a reseller. The manager, who recognizes me as a good customer, came over and said they have a policy of not allowing resellers to buy anything less than 2 weeks in the store and she informed me she would have to go through my items and pick out what I would be allowed to buy; about half. I said that was unacceptable for a variety of reasons; mainly they don't have this policy posted anywhere and I am a paying customer regardless of what I do with the things. I walked out leaving all the items behind.
    To me, there's a big difference in trademark infringement, such as the Coach and Pottery Barn cases, but a resale store...one that consigns. Do they tell their consignors upon agreeing to sell their items that they will refuse a sale to someone, if that someone is a consignor? Anyone else having this problem with resale stores?

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    1. I rarely shop at resale stores, they do seem to be the type to have an anti-reseller attitude more than any other vendor. Sorry you had so much trouble!

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  18. I get funny looks from the employees. I've also noticed they hide things in the store so no one finds them.

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    1. Luckily I don't get TOO many funny looks even though I'm taking pictures which is generally suspicious. Especially when I used to use my SLR.

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  19. I run a non-profit thrift store. Our mission is to provide our merchandise at the most affordable rate possible to people who need it. That means we sell to elderly citizens that are struggling to make ends meet and to young mothers raising children on their own and everyone in between. We try to serve everyone, but if a reseller tries to buy every item on one shelf then they are going against my mission and by law I must refuse to sell to them or risk losing my non-profit status. So, before you start bashing a non-profit thrift store because they are refusing to sell to you then go to their website and read their mission. It's pretty much a guarantee that they don't give a crap how much money you have or how much you're willing to spend on it if you are interfering with their work. And if they are anything like my community center then they are mostly made up of volunteers, meaning they do not get paid for any of their time that they invested in sorting, marking, cleaning and repairing merchandise, they did it in hopes that someone who needs it will be purchasing it at the low cost price tag they put on it not for the sake of some reseller making a profit on all of their volunteered hard work.

    FYI: If you are reselling merchandise you need to go through your local government agency, invest in a resellers permit, own a legal business, and buy from authorized wholesalers. Even wholesalers can refuse to sell to you if you do not follow their guidelines by pricing merchandise higher or lower than they permit.

    ~Chelas

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